Tag Archives: Ommegang Brewing Co.

Beer Bread Showdown

22 Nov

In a joint effort with Foodonia we have put together a beer bread test group, if you will.  We baked four loaves of bread all using the same recipe just adding a different beer to see how the results varied.

Beers Used:

the lineup

Budweiser was used because most recipes online call for Coors, or Bud light and a close friend requesting using straight-up Bud.  I chose #9 for it’s bit of Belgian yeast funk and spices.  The porter was used because I wanted to use a  beer with good, pronounced darker malts.  Lastly, Ommegang’s Hennepin was chosen for it’s white pepper notes and farmhouse qualities.

For a review of the bread baking process and recipe used make sure to check out Foodonia’s post.

The results were not exactly how I guessed things would have turned out.  The porter I had predicted to have tasted the best, however, almost none of the flavors stuck to the bread.  For the most part, it only imparted it’s color to the bread.  The Budweiser was deemed the worst of the breads.  The #9 and the Hennepin both came out giving off good flavors.  I preferred the Hennepin, though others backed the #9, and for good reason.

They boast a remarkably clean oven

The breads came out looking stupid.  I don’t really know how else to say it but they didn’t really get too much of a crust.  This is purely an aesthetic problem because the breads all tasted fine.  They were best after sitting for some time and for whatever reason when the bread is toasted the beer flavors become more pronounced. *shrugs*

If we were to do this again (and we may very well refine the recipe and the beers and give it another go) then I would consider using the following beers:

Young’s Double Chocolate Stout, Samuel Adam’s Winter Lager, Southern Tier’s Pumking, and Brown’s Harvest IPA.

 

Ommegang Tasting

29 Sep

While many a foolish soul was at Larkfest in Albany, NY my friends and I were at a different, much smaller venue enjoying an overlooked event: an Ommegang tasting at Oliver’s on Colvin Ave.

Wes Nick laying down beer law

I was secretly hoping that not a lot of people would be at this tasting when I got there.  I am unsure as to how many in total turned out for it, as it was not widely advertised.  Ommegang has become one of my favorite brewery’s because of, well it’s beer and it’s proximity to the capital region.

One of their evening brewer’s, Wes Nick, was on hand and happily pouring samples of Rare Vos, Three Philosophers, Hennepin, Bier de Mars and their newest creation: Cup ‘o Kyndness.  Wes was proud to announce and boast of their bronze medal taken home from the Great American Beer Festival the week before for Three Philosophers, as well as thrilled when we were delighted by the floral qualities of Bier de Mars.

Oliver’s (Brew Crew) is a beverage center located in Albany that needs to be checked out by anyone in the area who is serious about craft beer.  They have a surprisingly good selection of American microbrews as well as European imports.  Additionally, they also have 5-6 beers on tap for you to top off your growler for a pretty reasonable price.  They are a good stop for someone wanting to try a selection of beers: they offer a make-your-own 6 pack and knock three dollars of the total price just for making your own.

16th Annual Mount Snow Brewers Festival

6 Sep

they had beer

This event took place September 4th and 5th at Mt. Snow in VT (1.5 hour drive from Albany.)  It featured 31 breweries, 80 varieties of beer and over 200 kegs.  Breweries included: Long Trail, Magic Hat, Otter Creek, Wolaver’s Organic, Harpoon, Olde Burnside, Berkshire Brewing Co., Stone Brewing Co., Allagash, Saranac, North Coast, Stoudts, Rock Art, Woodchuck Ciders, Dogfish Head, Sam Adams, Brooklyn Brewing Co., Rouge Brewing, Smuttynose, Sierra Nevada, Northshire Brewing Company, Peak Organic, FArnum Hill Ciders, McNeil’s Brewery, Trapp Family Lodge Brewing Co., Flying Dog Brewing Co., Ommegang Brewing Co., Original Sin Ciders and Eurobrew.

they had people...

My initial attempt to reach the festival on Saturday resulted in a flat tire and a day spent with tow trucks and waiting rooms of garages.  On Sunday I re-gathered my courage and set out for some brews.

Entry into the event cost $25 per person, came with a pint glass and two tokens which could be redeemed for 8 oz. beer samples.  With an additional 5 tokens added to my pocket after entry I was on my way to sample some beer, finally.

I started my tasting light: Alagash’s white.  Despite a drunk, stumbling loud mouth swearing up and down to have their Tripel (which I am sure is also delicious) I chose their white ale and was not disappointed.  Round two went darker as I found Sierra Nevada’s booth.  I left there with a glass full of Tumbler and a brochure on brewing sustainability.

The rest of my beer intake went as one would expect: rather rapidly.  Notable mentions and kudos to the Olde Burnside Brewery for their TenFidy Wit and their Dirty Penny, pre-mixed black and tan.  Having grown up on the banks of the Battenkill River I could not resist the Northshire Brewery’s Battenkill Ale, which did not disappoint, nor did their Equinox Pilsner.  Our last surprise came out of Peak Organic’s Espresso Amber Ale.

Overall this festival packed in the beer and the breweries.  However, the food for the most part was lacking.  In future years I thought that it may be a good idea to try and include local food vendors as well as local breweries.  I realize this means less of an income from the Mt. Snow food, but surely something could be worked out.

I look forward to this event again next summer, as well as their winter brew fest which is sure to be interesting.